Employer – Nova Scotia, Halifax, Construction, Workplace, Occupational, Industrial, Trades, Certified, Health & Safety

Steps to COR Certification




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How to Become Safety Certified

 

Step 1: Determine Your Membership Status

To determine your membership status or for additional information, contact us at 902.468.6696 or 1.800.971.3888 (toll free within Nova Scotia).

You’re an Construction Safety Nova Scotia Member if:

If you do not fall within our membership codes but you still require our services, you can participate as an Associate Member or Associate Member Plus. An Associate Member Plus application form can be found here.

 

Step 2: Training Requirements

Before beginning your training, you should assess the needs of your company. Construction Safety Nova Scotia offers programs based on company size to assist employers in achieving Certificate of Recognition (COR) status. The four COR classifications include:

 

Owner/Operator (one person operation)

This type of operation does not regularly employ additional persons, with the exception of administrative support, and does not subcontract any work.

Training Requirements:

Small Business (2-4 persons)

Small business is defined as an operation employing two to four persons: inclusive of all employees, owners and any administrative support. This classification does not regularly hire subcontractors as a part of its operation.

Training Requirements:

Intermediate (5-19 persons)

Training Requirements:

This training is known as the Certificate of Recognition (COR) program. All employees must also receive compliance training required by the Nova Scotia Occupational Health and Safety Act and other relevant legislation.

Standard (20 or more persons)

Training requirements are the same as the Intermediate classification. However, there are differences in the program and legislative requirements. For this reason, we have created a separate category to help simplify the process.

Staff Requirements:

You will need to ensure that all staff has completed the training required to meet your obligations under the Nova Scotia Occupational Health and Safety Act.

Supervisors must also complete all appropriate training prior to receiving certification.

Depending on the type and environment of the work involved, training may include, but is not limited to, the following:

Complete Your OHS Training

 

Step 3: Implement Your Program & Complete Your COR Evaluation

Your company is working towards completion of a safety manual and putting the required management systems in place. When you are satisfied with the level and quality of your safety program, you will be able to measure the results by conducting an internal COR Evaluation on your company.

Firms requiring assistance at this stage can contact the Construction Safety Nova Scotia staff for assistance.

The Construction Safety Nova Scotia has two COR Evaluation Instruments for the following:

  • Owner/Operator Safety Instrument (for use by Owner/Operators)
  • COR Evaluation Instrument (for Small Business, Standard and Intermediate categories)

Upon completion of a satisfactory internal COR evaluation, a copy of your COR materials must be submitted to the Construction Safety Nova Scotia for review. At this time, a date may be set for an Construction Safety Nova Scotia Advisor to complete the external evaluation (if required).

 

Owner/Operator (one person operation)

This type of operation does not regularly employ additional persons, with the exception of administrative support, and does not subcontract any work.

COR Evaluation Requirements:

Owner/Operators must complete the Owner/Operator document and submit it to the Construction Safety Nova Scotia annually to retain the Construction Safety Nova Scotia COR.

Small Business (2-4 persons)

Small business is defined as an operation employing two to four persons: inclusive of all employees, owners and any administrative support. This classification does not regularly hire subcontractors as a part of its operation.

COR Evaluation Requirements:

The small business classification must complete the COR Evaluation Instrument and submit it to the Construction Safety Nova Scotia annually to retain the Construction Safety Nova Scotia COR.

The Construction Safety Nova Scotia performs random spot evaluations on approximately 5% of the anniversary evaluations submitted to ensure adherence to, and the integrity of, the process.

Intermediate (5-19 persons)

COR Evaluation Requirements:

Intermediate and Standard classifications participate in the COR cycle. This process involves an internal evaluation (performed by you) and an external evaluation (performed by the Construction Safety Nova Scotia). This occurs on a three year basis and repeats on year four.

  • Year 1: Internal evaluation by you, followed by an external evaluation by the Construction Safety Nova Scotia.
  • Year 2: Internal Evaluation by you, submitted for review to the Construction Safety Nova Scotia (anniversary COR Evaluation).
  • Year 3: Internal evaluation by you, submitted for review by the Construction Safety Nova Scotia (anniversary COR Evaluation).
  • Year 4: Returns to the beginning of the cycle.

Standard (20 or more persons)

COR requirements are the same as the Intermediate classification. However, there are differences in the program and legislative requirements. For this reason, we have created a separate category to help simplify the process.

 

 

Step 4: Certificate of Recognition (COR)

After successfully completing a COR Evaluation, a Letter of Good Standing will be issued. The Letter of Good Standing is the bid requirement document currently being used by purchasers of construction services requiring certification.